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Norwegian Forest Cat

 
Grooming: 

Contrary to popular belief, Wegies do need their human to comb (not brush) through the dense undercoat, removing the dead, loose hair at least once a week. Otherwise, the shedding undercoat will tangle and snarl in the topcoat and long guard hairs, creating some very challenging mats. Also, Wegies are naturally oily, which creates the waterproofing of the topcoat. If your Wegie gets too oily, then a bath is in order. Be prepared to use water, lots of water. Remember that this cat is waterproof. Shampoo will help the water become heavier. Brushing, instead of combing, will only encourage the oil glands to produce more oil.

Temperament: 

Sweet, loving, gentle, affectionate, intelligent, and non-aggressive with other household pets. Not demanding of attention. Content to be near, rather than on their person. Wary and sometimes not friendly with strangers. Wegies are brave, inquisitive, dog like in their actions. Wegies have a tendency to form a special bond with one person in the home. Whole males are territorial, not only with space, but with ?their? person as well. Kittens are lively, especially females. To be owned by this rare and beautiful treasure is a unique experience. The love and devotion these beautiful cats unconditionally give is almost indescribable. Heaven comes to mind.

Information supplied by: 

Debra Baker - Amorino Cattery

Nebelung

 
History: 

Combining long silky hair with the elegant Russian Blue body type, the Nebelung breed recreates the Russian longhair. These gorgeous cats were exhibited in the very first British cat shows over one hundred years ago. Today they are a championship breed in the International Cat Association.Although the Russian longhair ceased to exist as a separate breed with the establishment of the modern cat fancy, individual unrelated cats with its traits have appeared in the United States and Russia. Seigfried (born 1984) and Brunhid (born 1985) were the first registered Nebelungs. They produced their first litter in 1986. Shortly after the kittens were born, application was mad to TICA for new breed status (NBC) for the Nebelung. The breed standard was based on the Russian Blue, except for the coat length. In 1987 TICA accepted the Neblungs as longhaired Russian Blues.

Temperament: 

The Nebelung is highly intelligent, gentle and loving to its owners and family members, but may shy with strangers, especially young children. A kitten may take time to adjust to its new home. If allowed to make its own advances, it should become a devoted companion. Many Nebelungs are lap sitters and love to be petted. Often they follow their owners form room to room, if allowed, they enjoy sleeping on their owner?s bed.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copelandÿ

Russian Blue

 
Information supplied by: 

This breed information has been assembled from a number of area which include "The Legacy of the Cat" by Gloria Stephens, "Eyewitness Handbooks - Cats" by David Alderton and the "TICA Breed Standards".ÿ As well, much information was obtained on the Internet. It was submitted to us by Southern Alberta Calgary Cat Fanciers

Savannah

 
History: 

In the mid 1980?s, Judee Frank, a Pennsylvania cat fancier, was given an African Serval cub to keep for a friend. This Serval cub was raised with domestic mixed-breed kittens, and at the approximate age of 2 years, sired a single kitten out of one of the domestic females. Since Servals tend to bond closely with the person who raises them, the owner of the Serval cub decided to take possession of the kitten, rather than reclaiming the Serval male. This kitten was named ?Savannah?, and went on to produce a litter of kittens sired by a Turkish Angora. Unfortunately, Savannah never ended up getting pregnant again. However, this initial cross received the attention of other breeders who went on to duplicate this hybrid breeding. The breed adopted the name of the first kitten produced, and has been called ?the Savannah Cat? ever since. Today, there are over 40 breeders working on this breed, but less than 200 cats registered with The International Cat Association (TICA). In 1996, a few of the early Savannah breeders submitted the Savannah Standard to TICA. However, due to a moratorium on new breeds, the Savannah was not granted new breed status, at that time.In January of 2000, a small group of Savannah breeders joined together to form the Savannah International Member and Breeder Association (SIMBA). It was through the efforts of this dedicated group of breeders, that the Savannah was finally accepted in September of 2000, for registration status, as a new breed, by TICA.Through the efforts of SIMBA, the Savannnah cat gained Evaluation status within TICA in May of 2002, thus enabling this noble breed to gain entry into the show halls of TICA throughout the world.

Temperament: 

The Savaannah is confident, alert, curious, friendly, and affectionate. It is very ?puppy-like? in its approach to life, ever playful, and full of energy. It will retrieve, loves water, and can learn to walk on a leash. These cats are quite vocal, but their ?meow? is not that of a typical cat, and may sound as if the cat is ?complaining?. Any evidence of a challenging disposition, however, is grounds for immediate disqualification from a show.

Information supplied by: 

Arden Morley, Vice President of the Savannah International Member and Breeder Association. - Arden Morley can be reached through her cattery at Camelottaspots

Japanese Bobtail

 
Information supplied by: 

This breed information has been assembled from a number of area which include "The Legacy of the Cat" by Gloria Stephens, "Eyewitness Handbooks - Cats" by David Alderton and the "TICA Breed Standards".ÿ As well, much information was obtained on the Internet. It was submitted to us by Southern Alberta Calgary Cat Fanciers

Korat

 
History: 

This is a very old shorthair breed from Thailand, dating back as far as the mid-fourteenth century. The Korat was first seen in England at a cat show as early as 1896. The first pair to be imported to the United States arrived in 1959 and were registered at that time. In 1966 the Korat competed in the championship classes for the first time. By 1969 all associations in North America recognized them for championship. Many believe the Korat to be the forerunner of the blue point Siamese. In Thailand, the Korats are known as Si-Sawat cats. Si means color. Swat means good fortune or prosperity; it also means a mingled color of gray and light green. The gift of a pair of Si-Sawat cats to a bride insures a fortunate marriage. The Thai people place so much value on the Si-Sawat cat that it is rare for one to be sold. They will give them as gifts to those thy hold in high esteem.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copeland

LaPerm

 
History: 

The kitten that exhibited traits of the original mutation that has formed the basis for the LaPerm breed sprang from strong, healthy, domestic "barn-cat" stock. In 1982, on an Oregon farm located near the ancient hunting and fishing grounds of the Wishram Indians, a litter of six kittens was born to a barn cat. One of the kittens was born completely bald -- looking nothing like her mother or her littermates. While the kitten had no hair, it did have large wide-spaced ears and a blueprint pattern on her skin that mimicked a classic tabby pattern. Within eight weeks the kitten began to grow very soft, curly hair. At three to four months of age the kitten, now named "Curly," had a full coat of curly hair. Not being very knowledgeable about cats, the owner accepted the "mutant" as unique and thought nothing more of the matter.During the next 10 years no attempt was made to breed selectively but as the frequency of bald kittens increased in the random bred litters, the owner of the farm began to seek additional information about her unusual cats. She had no knowledge of genetics or breeding and thus allowed the cats to roam freely throughout the barns and orchard for several years. As she became aware of how truly unique these cats were, she started to confine the cats and control the breedings. It appeared that the curly gene was dominant and carried by both males and females. This breeder was totally unprepared for the interest and excitement generated by cats she decided to enter in a cat show. The owner gave the cats the breed name "LaPerm," which means wavy or rippled.

Grooming: 

The LaPerm can sport anything from a wavy coat to ringlet-type curls that range from tight ringlets to long corkscrew curls. The tightest curls occur on the underside of the cat, on the throat area and at the base of the ears. The longhair is generally blessed with a curly plumed tail and often exhibits a full, curly ruff. The coat is moderately soft in texture, yet each cat's coat is distinctly unique.Then perfect cat will have a moderately soft, springy coat texture standing away from the body in ringlet curls or waves over most of the cat. The thicker and heavier the coat the better.The shorthair has more texture to the coat than does the longhaired variety. It does not have the ruff, has a "bottle-brush" type tail and the coat generally stands away from the body, parting down the middle.The coat can vary in length and fullness according to the season and maturity of the cat.The LaPerm comes in every recognized color and coat pattern. Some kittens can be born hairless, but most have short wavy hair or straight hair at birth. Kittens often go almost totally bald beginning with a spot on the tops of their heads. This process generally starts when the kittens are about two weeks old and they can be in varying stages of baldness during their first four months or so. The coat will generally come back in and will always be curly if the kitten was born curly. Coat variations throughout the life of a LaPerm range from molting that can leave a sparse, thin coat for life to a possible full coat after neutering or spaying.

Information supplied by: 

Maine Coon

 
History: 

Many believe the Norwegian Forest cat to be an ancestor of the Maine Coon; indeed, some of the present-day Norwegian Forest cats in Norway resemble the Maine Coon. Other believe them to be the result of mating, in Maine, between semi-wild domestic cats and raccoons ( a genetic impossibility), hence the name. Another story tells that a cat was brought by ship to Maine by a certain Captain Coon, and that it escaped, lived in the woods and with the semi-wild domestic cats. The breed probably developed through a process of natural selection. Whatever the origin, it may be surmised that breeders discovered these wonderful animals and carefully bred them to preserve the look of the original ?wild? Maine Coons.There is little doubt that this breed has been around for a long time. Maine Coons were exhibited in many of the early cat shows, one winning the 1895 Madison Square Gardens Cat Show. These magnificent cats fell from favor with the arrival of the flashier Persians from Great Britain, only to come back to full glory in recent years through the dedicated efforts of American breeders. The earlier Maine Coons were often regarded with disdain, some breeders referring to them as barn cats or alley cats. They did not have an eye for the rugged beauty of this cat! In the 1950s Maine Coons were shown once again and in the 1970s they started making a real comeback by winning the Best in Show awards. The Maines of today hold their own with any other breed. In the past, judges had been reluctant to award these rugged-looking, unpolished cats, so different from the manicured, every-hair-in-place, magnificent Persians. In today?s cat shows, Maines outnumber some of the other breeds. The Maines are here to stay!

Temperament: 

Males tend to be very possessive of their owner and extremely loyal. Females may appear, at times, to be grumpy, especially I they can bluff you. They may first growl; if that doesn?t work, they will ?huff and puff?. Even small kittens can call this bluff, causing the twelve pounder to slink away with tail between its legs. The females are excellent mothers, which is just as well, as litters may number seven or eight kittens. Maines are extremely intelligent and exhibit a keen interest in their surroundings. These are mellow cats, amiable and ealy to get along with when they know you. They give the impression of being kind and considerate. They do not necessarily want to be held, but want to be close to the person they love, following from room to room. Usually they will bond with only one person and are completely loyal to that individual. Maine Coons are usually very quiet, although when they see something as interesting as a bug or bird, they many stand on their hind legs, like a bear, and make a chirping sound. Many Maines will fetch and return an object. They do not like to be restricted, yet, loving the outdoors, they can be trained to walk on a leash. A Maine Coon will enjoy the snow and seem to even enjoy getting wet. These are truly gentle giants; they own you, not the other way around.

Information supplied by: 

Manx

 
History: 

There are some outlandish stories about how tailless cats came to the Isle of Man, where they may indeed have originated. Some say the Irish brought the cats to the island, using the cats? tails as plumes for their helmets. Other say Phoenician traders brought the cats with them from Japan and thus the Manx must be related to the Japanese Bobtail. This cannot be true, in part because the gene causing the curled tail of the Japanese Bobtail is different. In another story, a tailless cat swam ashore from a ship of Spanish Armada. According to one or more story, the cat was aboard Noah?s ark and Noah shut the door on the cat?s tail, cutting it off. Taillessness is a result of a dominant gene that occurred a long time ago. Due to a high death rate among kittens, there is scarcity of Manx today. Kittens from a homozygous dominant will die during the fetal stage, when the development of the spine is hindered.

Temperament: 

Once the kittens are past the endangered stage of development, they grow to be strong, healthy adults. The Manx makes excellent pets. They do tend to be loyal to only one person and aloof but not unkind to others. They are excellent hunters and enjoy tree climbing. They are quiet, rather reserved cats and are excellent, faithful companions especially for the person living alone.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copeland