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Tonkinese

 
History: 

An American in the early 1930s brought home a cat acquired in Burma. Named Wong Mau, this cat is believed to have been a Tonkinese, not a Burmese. Tonkinese were not registered until the 1960s in Canada; championship status was first granted by the Canadian Cat Association. The early Tonkinese were sometimes called Golden Siamese, having Siamese pointing and the golden bronze-sepia pigmentation of the Burmese. The Tonkinese belong the albino series genetic system. The breed must carry one gene for pointing and one gene for Burmese or sepia coloration to produce the mink coloration. Tonkinese-to- Tonkinese breeding may produce one pointed kitten, one with Burmese coloring and two Tonkinese. This combination allows the darker points, the slightly lighter body color, and a reduction of some of the pigmentation in the front of the eye, producing blue-green eye coloring.

Temperament: 

The Tonkinese make healthy, beautiful, charming pets and show cats. They are quite active and love to run and jump, enjoying plenty of exercise. They are gregarious, outgoing and affectionate. The aqua eye coloring, the two-toned body with its soft, gently flowing contours, the blending of the Burmese and Siamese coloring, boning and personalities make the Tonkinese a very beautiful and endearing cat.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copeland

Burmese

 
History: 

All contemporary Burmese cats trace their ancestry to a Tonkinese. Wong Mau, brought to the United States by Dr. J. Thompson. Dr. Thompson was interested in the unique color of Wong Mau, and in order to explore it, bred her to a seal point Siamese. The resulting kittens were Siamese, and Tonkinese. The Tonkinese resulting from this breeding, if bred together, or, one of the Tonkinese males bred back o Wong Mau, produced the following kittens: one sepia color, two mink and one pointed. Such was the start of the Burmese breed as we know it today.The early Burmese were different from today?s, having longer heads and bodies and fine bones. In 1947, the Cat Fanciers Association stopped recognizing the Burmese for championship status because they were not descended the three generations of ?Burmese?. It was not until 1953 that they were once again allowed championship status. The semi-foreign type of Burmese of the 1950s remained until ether 1960s, when breeders started changing the type to the shorter, cobby Burmese seen today.

Temperament: 

Burmese are well know for their adaptability. They are as comfortable in apartment life as they are in country living. These cats are extremely calm. The breed as a whole is rather quiet in voice. They are easy to care for, needing only an occasional grooming with a fine-tooth comb, and even better, a rubdown from their owner?s hand, which they love. They make excellent pets, and are loyal and affectionate.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copeland

Chartreux

 
History: 

The Chartreux's origin is shrouded in the mists of antiquity. Many claim the cat came to Europe from the mountains of Syria at the time of the Crusades. The cats may very well have begun their lives in Europe at the monasteries guarding granaries and other food stuffs precious to the monks. At one time the cats were common and hunted for their exquisite double fur which was used for trimming ladies? coats. By the end of WWII the cats were all but extinct with survivors existing in only a few isolated areas of France.

Temperament: 

Ideally, Chartreux are sweet, docile creatures being great conservators of energy except for the occasional outburst once or twice a day. Personal characteristics vary: some are mute, some pray, some fetch. They are good travelers. All tend to be very devoted to their owners and will follow their significant person around the house staying near but rarely intruding on their owner?s personal space.

Information supplied by: 

Judy Belden - Chanson Bleu ( http://www.bluecatfarm.com/new_page_6.htm)

Chausie

 
Information supplied by: 

This breed information has been assembled from a number of area which include "The Legacy of the Cat" by Gloria Stephens, "Eyewitness Handbooks - Cats" by David Alderton and the "TICA Breed Standards".ÿ As well, much information was obtained on the Internet. It was submitted to us by Southern Alberta Calgary Cat Fanciers

Cornish Rex

 
History: 

The first known Rex was born in 1950 in a litter of kittens from two ordinary short-coated cats in Cornwall, England. The coat was different in that it was wavy. The red and white wavy-coated male kitten (named Killibunker) was bred back to its mother, who produced more wavy-coated kittens. These were later to be called Rex, after the rabbits of the same name. All Cornish Rex cats thus trace their ancestry back to Killibunker.Further breeding revealed the wavy coat to be true, recessive mutation. Many breeders were used in the development of the Rex, resulting in a large gene pool making almost every color and pattern available.

Temperament: 

The Cornish Rex has a very alert and athletic look and is very intelligent, outgoing and affectionate. Little or not grooming is required as the cat does not constantly shed. But one of the greatest delights is hand grooming the Rex; to run your hand over the body of a Rex feels so pleasant that care must be taken to not overdo it. The cat likes a warmer environment, as there is not much hair to protect it from the cold. Although it has a normal temperature, the Rex may feel warmer than most other cats.Rex cats are extremely curious about their surroundings. They indulge in special acrobatics and ?ground speed racing? and are known clowns. Their easy grooming, soft wavy coats and intelligence make them delightful cats to show and have as pets.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copeland

Devon Rex

 
History: 

The first know Rex was born in 1950 when a wavy-haired kitten was born into a litter from two ordinary short-coated cats in Cornwall, England. In 1960, in Devon, England, a similarly coated kitten appeared. At first it was thought that this strain could be used as an outcross for the Cornish Rex but the Devon gene was not compatible with the Cornish Rex gene. When a Cornish was mated to a Devon, only straight haired kittens were produced. The mutations were located at different positions on the chromosome. The Cornish Rex and the Devon Rex would then go their separate ways, each being bred for different body types and waviness.

Temperament: 

The Devon is alert, active and shows a lively interest in its surroundings. It has a good disposition, a very quiet voice and is especially suitable for apartment life. These cats make a sweet, loving pets and are a delight to show.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copeland

Egyptian Mau

 
History: 

The Mau closely resembles the cats in the wall painting of ancient Egypt; its ancestors could have been the cat loved and worshipped in those times. The modern Mau reported dates back to 1953 in Italy. Exhibition of these cats took place in 1955, at the Rome Cat Show. The Mau had to wait until 1968 for championship recognition in North America.

Temperament: 

Egyptian Maus are active, colorful cats, curious about everything, yet reserved. They love to lap sit or ride on their owners shoulders and have been known to ?cup? their paws like hands to drink water. They are quite friendly and affectionate to the people they like but will sometimes shy away from strangers. When the Mau is happy, it will wag its tail like a dog, Maus are delightful pets.

Information supplied by: 

Southern Alberta Cat Fanciers - Rene Copeland